FDA shrinks down use of Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccine

FDA says it will allow the Johnson & Johnson single shot vaccine only for people who have not taken the mRNA vaccine

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Johnson & Johnson is known for its single shot COVID-19 vaccine. But the Food and Drug Administration has restricted the use of the single-shot vaccine only for the adults who are not able to or are not willing to get the Pfizer –BioNTech or Moderna shots based on mRNA. The recent decision has been made after a complete investigation was carried out by the agency on the risk of developing thrombosis with thrombocytopenia syndrome also known as TTS. It is a rare condition that involves blood clots and can also prove to be fatal. When such a condition is combined with low platelet count it could be even more dangerous.

A number of people who received the vaccine had complained about the problem weeks after receiving the vaccine. The FDA considered the severity and urgency of the syndrome and availability of other vaccines and decided that the benefits of the COVID-19 protection from the Johnson & Johnson vaccine had outweighed the risk of TTS only for those who cannot or are not willing to receive other forms of vaccinations. Peter Marks, the director of Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research at FDA, in a statement said that the action has been taken on the basis of their evaluation of the risk of thrombosis with thrombocytopenia syndrome.

Marks added that the Janssen vaccine by Johnson continues to have a role in the ongoing pandemic response in the United States. The statement added that the agency would continue to monitor the safety of the vaccine and all other vaccines. On the other hand Johnson & Johnson in a statement said that it would continue to work with the regulators across the globe to ensure that the consumers are completely informed and are also aware of the risks.

The vaccine manufacturer has also assured that it would continue to make efforts to make vaccines available during the pandemic.

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