How processed foods leads to faster ageing

Consumption of ultra-processed foods is directly related to faster ageing process

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It is a very known fact that consumption of processed food is never healthy and should be avoided to the maximum. They lead to weight gain issues, which can also lead to other weight related problems like heart problems, obesity and other chronic diseases. Apart from such problems, it also leads to faster ageing.

There are processed foods and ultra-processed foods and both have different effects on our health. First it is important to understand which foods fall under the respective categories and how they affect your overall health. Ultra-processed foods could be some of the mouthwatering items like cup cakes, flavoured potato chips, candy and all that is fried and include artificial flavoring, preservatives, emulsifiers and additives. Processed foods are made from added sugar, oil, salt, etc.

They can also be packaged foods that have a longer shelf life which indicates that they have preservatives as well. One of the big reasons for weight gain is ultra-processed foods and can also lead to some chronic health problems. A new study has mentioned that two or more servings of ultra-processed foods per day can affect the health and also harms the DNA. Here telomere helps to know the biological age of a person and can also predict the health risks. When you find out that the telomeres are reducing, this is a clear indication that a chronic disease could be underway and you also tend to become more vulnerable.

The ultra-processed foods are the actual culprits that affects the telomeres. In such a case you need to cut out or reduce the consumption of such foods. However, once in a while binging does not do any harm, but it is always better to avoid. Eating healthy, helps to keep the organs of the body functioning properly and also keeps the person energetic throughout the day. After consuming processed foods, it can be noticed that a person trends to become drowsy.

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