Pfizer says COVID pill could also be taken by patients who face relapse

Pfizer executives have assured that the COVID pill treatment can be repeated in case of a relapse infection

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COVID-19

Pfizer had made a difference by introducing a drug for treating patients with COVID-19 infection. However a few reports mentioned that patients experienced a relapse of the infection even after completing the entire course of the medicine. To provide assurance, executives from Pfizer Inc said that patients who have faced a relapse can take more of the medicine. But as per the current guidelines in the United States, it has been limited to be used for five consecutive days.

Paxlovid, is the drug here in question. Albert Bourla, the Chief Executive Officer at Pfizer during an interview said that Paxlovid does what it has to do and then it is the body that does its job. The CEO added that for some reason some people are not able to clear the virus with the first course of the drug. However, Bourla did give a solution and suggested that in such cases where the virus levels rebound, then the second course can be administered in the same way that it done with anti-biotics.

Meanwhile the Food and Drug Administration has not responded for a comment on how antivirals should be prescribed to the COVID-19 patients who face a rebound of the infection. Paxlovid has been approved under emergency authorization but has not yet gained a complete approval. The directions for the drug has mentioned that it is not authorized for use for longer than five consecutive days.

Talking about the drug. President Joe Biden has said that the drug for COVID019 could be a game changer to slow down the pandemic. Even the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases scientist said that the drug would provide a crucial understanding as to why the virus levels rebound in some of the patients who have already completed the five-day course. The introduction of the drug for COVID-19 proves to be promising amidst a time when economic recovery continues to remain stable.

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