Tinder users can hit the panic button in case of emergency

Tinder to have panic button for emergency and other anti-catfishing features

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Dating service App Tinder is popular among youngsters and allows the users to chat with each other if they like each other. To add more safety and usability to the users, the app has added a panic button and more safety features. New features will include emergency assistance, photo verification and location tracking. The fresh features will first be launched on January 28, 2020 only in the US. The dating app has not informed on when it would be launching the features globally.

Match Group, is the parent company and aims to rollout the features on other dating platforms later in 2020. The parent company also owns the platforms like OkCupid, PlentyOfFish and Hinge. Tinder will be making use of the emergency response services along with personal safety products that are provided by Noonlight. The parent company had earlier invested in Noonlight. The users will hereafter be able to allow the users to alert the emergency services and will also convey highly accurate location details.

This means that before a meeting is fixed, the users can save the information about the person they are expected to meet and will also mention about the place where the date will take place. The users will have the liberty to hit the panic button after which the emergency service will get to work and will be having the details with accurate location data. There is also a new photo verification data that will help the users to escape catfishing which can be handy when a person is using a fake identity online.

This is where Artificial Intelligence will get to work that will be human assisted and will check the profile pictures that have been uploaded to the app. The users will be asked to take many real time selfies to verify their pictures that have been uploaded. The new move has been taken amidst criticism that dating apps do not take ample measures to protect its users.

Photo Credits: Pixabay