Eating a handful of nuts a day can help keep away gradual weight gain

A study has said that consuming a handful of nuts in a day can help you keep away from gradual weight gain

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Experts have always talked about tossing a few nuts on an everyday basis. A new study has supported the consumption of nuts that is linked to less weight gain and lower obesity risk. Researchers say that one has to just substitute half of a daily serving of unhealthy foods with nuts that can help stave of gradual weight gain. Nuts consumption has to be increased by just half a serving a day and is linked to less weight gain and lower risk of obesity.

The results were found in a long term observational study that was published in the online journal BMJ Nutrition, Prevention & Health. Unhealthy foods like processed meats, French fries and crisps have to be substituted with a half a serving of nuts and can be a simple strategy to keep away the gradual weight gain that often accompanies with aging process. On an average it has been noticed that the US adults put on 1lb or nearly half a kilo every year.

An increase of 2.5 – 10 kilos in weight is linked to a significantly greater risk of heart disease/Stroke and diabetes. It is known that nuts are rich in healthy unsaturated fats, minerals, vitamins and fibre and they are calorie dense, so are often not thought of so good for weight control. But some of the emerging evidences has suggested that the quality of what is eaten may be as important as the quantity. In the past two decades it has been noticed that there has been a modest increase in average nut consumption in the US and the researchers wanted to find out if such changes might affect weight control.

After more than 20 years of monitoring, the participants were asked every 4 years to state their weight and how often they had eaten a serving of nuts including peanuts and peanut butter. Increasing consumption of any type of nut was associated with lower risk of putting on 2 or more kilos over any 4 year period.

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