Study suggests to eat just six French fries

A professor from Harvard University has appealed to limit the portion size of French fries as it lacks nutrition

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french fries

Fresh fries is one of the favourite snacks of people of all age groups across the globe. But a new study has warned about the consumption of the yummy snack. A professor of epidemiology and nutrition at Harvard University has recommended six French Fries as a recommended portion size. In an interview, Professor Eric Rimm has talked about the salty snack.

Rimm has referred the snack as starch bombs and added that potatoes generally lack the children of nutrients and compounds which are otherwise found in leafy or green vegetables. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition had published a study in 2017 which mentioned that people who ate fried potatoes two to three times a week are at greater risk of mortality. On the other hand the individuals who ate unfried potatoes had a lower risk.

The US Department of Agriculture has figures which says that Americans eat an average of 115 pounds of white potatoes in a year and a majority of them are in the form of French fries. However, it is obvious that six fries do not satisfy the cravings. In that case the New York Times article has suggested some of the healthy alternatives like getting the smallest order size or splitting the order in half. If that still does not satisfy your cravings then there are options like home fries, home baked and sweet potato fries which are considered as more healthy than those which are served at the fast food restaurants.

Rimm’s suggestions had outrage from the public on Twitter. One of the Twitter user expressed, “What kind of MAD MAN would want six french fries? I get it, they are bad for you, but eating SIX sounds like torture. I’d rather not have them at all. But we all know that’s not going to happen.” For many years doctors and medical practitioners have asked to limit the portion size of any fried food so as to maintain a good health.

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